Plastic Wall Panels Offer Numerous Advantages

Plastic Wall Panels Offer Numerous Advantages

Wall panels were traditionally wood and people are still enamored of this age-old material. However, wood has many problems as wall paneling. It accumulates dirt that is difficult to remove, is prone to insect attack and rot, and needs comparatively expensive painting at regular intervals to maintain it in reasonable condition.

Plastic wall panels made of such materials as rigid PVC eliminate most of the problems. The smooth surfaces provided by plastics do not accumulate ingrained dirt; any superficial dust can be easily cleaned through, say, pressure washing. Plastic does not attract insects and does not rot. It is also impermeable to water and is not affected by damp the way wood is.

Plastic panels are also less expensive than good quality wood panels and do not require regular maintenance actions like painting.

Other Advantages of Plastic Wall Panels

Plastic can be given many different kinds of finish. They can accommodate decorative patterns like marble, abstract, wood, flowers and so on. Plain plastic can come in different colors like white, blue, green, cream and gray. For further decorative effects, plastic wall panels can be produced to accept decorations like silver and gold strips.

Plastic panels can be made to provide flush fitting joints. They are light yet durable. They can be combined with other materials like aluminum to produce composites that have good structural properties.

Plastic walls can also be made translucent, allowing natural daylight in, with thermal and solar controls, such as UV Light filtering properties. In addition to energy savings, this solution can create a great ambience inside. While light is allowed in, noise and dust are insulated against.

With automated lighting systems, lighting units can be turned on when natural light proves insufficient, leading to excellent lighting at all times, yet achieving great energy savings. And thermal controls can prevent heat loss during winter and heat gain during summer, adding to energy savings for heating.

Yet another advantage is that plastic wall panels can be produced to meet special needs such as different shapes, desired thickness, insulation properties, blast resistance and so on. There are explosion venting wall panels, for example, that are released from their mountings when internal pressure exceeds a certain level but still remain attached to the structure to prevent flying debris.

Conclusion

Wall panels were traditionally wood that suffers from various problems such as accumulation of dirt, high maintenance requirements and rot. Plastic wall panels offer a smooth surface that does not allow ingrained dirt accumulation. Plastic wall panels require little maintenance and do not get damp. Any superficial dust can be easily cleaned through washing and surface water can be quickly wiped away or dried out.

Probably the greatest advantage of plastic wall panels is that they can be customized to meet special requirements. Translucent panels can let in daylight; insulation properties can be built in to prevent heat loss/gain; shapes, sizes and thickness can be tailored to special requirements.

Plastic is less costly than wood and can produce recurring cost savings in maintenance and energy costs.

Hello From Toronto – A Culinary Tour Of The St. Lawrence Market & An Exploration Of Historic St. Lawrence Hall

Hello From Toronto – A Culinary Tour Of The St. Lawrence Market & An Exploration Of Historic St. Lawrence Hall

October 6, 2005

Life works in really strange and wonderful ways. At the beginning of this week I talked to my brother in Austria on the phone, and he said he’d been reading this German travel magazine and there was a big write-up about a Toronto-based tour guide who provides culinary tours of the St. Lawrence Market, one of my brother’s favourite places that he discovered on his recent trip to Toronto.

I asked my brother what this fellow’s name was and he looked it up and said “Bruce Bell”. I did an internet search and within a few seconds I had located Bruce Bell Tours ; and I knew I had to meet this person. Bruce Bell, the popular history columnist for the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Community Bulletin, is also an award winning playwright, actor, standup comedian and the honourary curator of the most photographed building in the city of Toronto, the historic Gooderham Building better known as the Flatiron. Bruce just recently published a book on Toronto called “Toronto – A Pictorial Celebration”.

Immediately after I hung up with my brother I was on the phone with Bruce, we briefly introduced ourselves and he said, come down, join me on Thursday for my culinary tour of the St. Lawrence Market. Sure enough, this morning, punctually at 10 am I arrived at the souvenir shop at the main entrance of the market and I met Bruce and the other participant in our tour, a young architecture student.

As the official historian of the St. Lawrence Market Bruce has special access to all sorts of areas of the building that other people never get to see. Right away he took us up some stairs, pulled out a special key and led us into the former mayor’s office, since the market building used to be the original city hall of Toronto. The building has undergone several transitions, and the two side wings were removed to make way for a steel-girdered shed built in 1904 that was modeled after the Victoria Train Station in London.

From the former mayor’s office we had a perfect view of the market and we also had a beautiful vista of the downtown skyscrapers and the famous Flatiron Building to the west, and St. Lawrence Hall to the north. Bruce took us down the stairs in the market hall itself and shared various tidbits of history with us. The shoreline of Lake Ontario used to be right at Front Street, and after landfill was added, the Esplanade became the waterfront, and today several hundred meters of additional landfill have expanded the city’s territory to a new waterfront.

Under Bruce’s guidance we started our tour of the shops which include bakeries, butcher shops, fish mongers, fruit stands, delis, dessert places and specialty vendors of all kinds. The first place he took us to was a bakery that also serves lunches, and we got a delicious taste treat of smoked salmon and backbacon, each on a small piece of bread. I am not usually a big fish eater, but this savoury morcel was delicious. At another store we got to sample “Indian candy” – smoked salmon cured in maple syrop. What a treat!

We walked by some of the butcher shops, many of which have been in the same family for generations. I admired the creatively presented cuts of pork loin stuffed with spinach, cheese and bacon, a perfect solution for a non-chef like me – just stick it in the oven and pull out a delicious gourmet meal.

After a brief tour outside the building where Bruce explained the building’s history and early Toronto society to us, we went into the lower level, where all the dessert shops, fruit stalls and specialty vendors are located. We got several more samples: a huge variety of delicious honeys from New Zealand, a sampling of speciality jellies and jams, tender white chocolate truffles that just melt in your mouth, and for dessert – after all these sweat treats – Nutella-filled crepes. All the samples we received were utterly delicious.

Bruce took us into the bowels of the building, today mostly used for storage and refrigeration, but in previous times these areas were the men’s and women’s jails. Bruce explained that in the 1850s women had no rights and many men simply stuck their wives in prison, especially after child-birth or during menopause, when they got a little cranky. The iron hooks that prisoners were chained to are still visible on the walls.

The basement is also decorated with a number of murals that explain Toronto’s history. As the official historian of the St. Lawrence Market and a well-known columnist of the St. Lawrence Community Bulletin, Bruce is actually depicted on the mural. About 15 historic plaques throughout a variety of buildings in the downtown area provide insight into noteworthy past events and are titled “A Bruce Bell History Project”. So there is no doubt that this is a real expert, even a local celebrity.

Just outside the St. Lawrence Market used to be the terminus of the Underground Railroad, the pier where thousands of the former American slaves arrived after having made their secret passage from the American south to Rochester and on to freedom in Toronto. It’s amazing how much history there is, even in a comparably young city such as Toronto, and I thoroughly enjoyed listening to Bruce’s unique stories.

From the St. Lawrence Market building we walked north through a courtyard to another former City Hall of Toronto by the name of St. Lawrence Hall. It was the former city hall of the City of York, that was officially renamed the city of Toronto (an Indian word for “meeting place”) in 1856. St. Lawrence Hall is a beautiful classical building, and Bruce took us inside to show us the ballroom, the most well-preserved original ballroom in Canada. The chandelier is original, was originally lit with coal gas and today is illuminated with natural gas.

This was the heart of Toronto’s elite WASP (white / Anglo-Saxon / Protestant) society during the 1800s and Bruce shed more light on the many behavioural norms of the time. Women were not considered persons and could not walk on the street by themselves or accompanied by any man other than their husband. Men had to defend their wives’ honour in duels and sometimes ended up having to shoot their best friend as a result of a harmless (by today’s standards) misunderstanding. The city and country were run by English noblemen, and Catholic immigrants from Ireland, arriving in masses after the potato famine of 1849, were despised by the local ruling class.

As a result, the Catholics were segregated, but they did receive a spot inside St. Lawrence Hall, a big room called St. Patrick’s Hall, where they were allowed to congregate since they were barred from entering the ballroom which was reserved for the WASP elite. Irish Catholics had to enter St. Patrick’s Hall through a back staircase since they weren’t allowed to mix with the English aristocracy. The portion on the northeast side of St. Lawrence Hall housing St. Patrick’s Hall incidentally collapsed in 1967 and was completely rebuilt.

After St. Lawrence Hall we walked through a beautiful Victorian Garden outside of St. James Cathedral, Toronto’s largest house of worship, and the 5th church in the present location. Bruce took us inside and shared more historical information with us, about the original British settlers of Toronto and ruling elite of the times, which included the famous Bishop Strachan, the creator of St. James Cathedral. Bruce showed us the various stained glass windows that adorn the church, all of which were crafted at different times. Especially stunning are the Tiffany stained glass windows on the east side which have a particularly intense coloration.

St. James Cathedral marked the end of our culinary and historic tour of the St. Lawrence Market area. We had received a great introduction to Toronto’s history and enjoyed the diverse culinary delicacies of Toronto’s greatest market. Bruce’s entertaining and informative lessons on a time in Toronto’s history when women and men were segregated, when society was strictly regimented by expectations of etiquette and social status, and when Irish and English weren’t allowed to mix made me realize how incredibly far Toronto has come in the last 150 years.

Bruce Bell offers other interesting tours about Toronto’s Distillery District, its Art Deco skyscrapers and a tour called “Comfort and Steam” that takes you through the Fairmount Royal York Hotel, Union Station, the Skydome and the Air Canada Centre, among other places. Considering everything that I learned in the St. Lawrence Market tour, I hope to have a chance to catch another one of Bruce’s tours and broaden my local knowledge of this city in the near future.

Mobile Marketing At Its Best: Here’s How You Do It (2)

Mobile Marketing At Its Best: Here’s How You Do It

Did you know that mobile marketing not only covers the most commonly referenced area of mobile devices, but also mobile billboards, travelling expos and any type of advertising that is in some sort of motion. If you ever wanted to further your knowledge of mobile marketing, then check out the next few paragraphs.

Include audio and video in your mobile marketing strategy. Mobile marketing is more than text messages and e-mails. Today, with faster mobile download speeds, audio and video are key components to any successful strategy. Consider offering audio or video podcasts, short audio interviews or live, on-the-scene video to your media mix.

Make your campaign compatible with all mobile platforms. Your ads must be displayable on all different types of smartsphone applications including Android, Blackberry and the iphone. It would be a mistake to not display on one of these platforms because you would be missing out on advertising to a huge portion of users.

Because users will be viewing them on small screens, mobile advertising messages need to be brief, clear and express urgency. Every ad should focus on a call to action that tells the market to do something. Forgetting to include a call to action in your mobile advertising messages is a common mistake that beginners often make.

Perform usability testing for your campaign. Enlist your friends, family and co-workers to help you by receiving messages and responding to them. Ask for feedback on ease of use and enjoyment. They should like what they see on the display and report that it was clear and easy to follow.

Utilize mobile search engine optimization. A majority of the mobile searches that are made are done using Google, so having a strong SEO strategy is just as important for mobile marketing as it is for other online ventures. In addition, many devices tailor search results by location, so be sure to include location-specific web pages.

Integrate your mobile ad campaign into every other aspect of your advertising to optimize the effects of it! Make note of it on your blog and online social networking accounts. This way you keep in your promotional loop all potential customers, whether they are in an office, car or waiting for a bus!

Integrate all of your social platforms with any location-based accounts that you have. Connect your website, blog, Twitter and Facebook URLs with your location-based pages as soon as possible. All platforms, including your mobile-marketing one, should have a consistent representation of your brand, or you risk confusing your customer base.

Make sure your advertisements work for all types of mobile devices. If your programming is only accessible by one type, like an Android, you will lose out on entire populations of prospective clients from other platforms. Using cross-platform programming is the best method to attract the most customers to your business.

In conclusion, not only does mobile marketing cover a wide amount of media types, but it can also be used to appeal to a wide variety of customers. You should definitely give the tips and tricks provided in this article a try; and you should be ecstatic with the results that you see.

Basic Guidelines On Painting The Aluminum Siding

Basic Guidelines On Painting The Aluminum Siding

While aluminum siding have been very popular in the market, and being advertised as a maintenance-free product, the reality hits homeowners when they see their house from the outside with the siding already having a faded finish and chalking.

The solution is not to take it out and install a new siding for your house; all the more it is not a solution to just let it be, and hoping it would look better the next time you look at your house siding. Have you considered painting the aluminum siding of your house?

Painting the aluminum siding, or repainting for that matter is the way to go. Not only will this be a less hassle on your part, it will also help you save more money than having to put new siding in place. In this way, you also get to choose from among the wide choices of colors, that appeals to your liking and that fits the style of your house.

The keys to a successful paint job lie in the proper surface preparation, the painting process, and the quality of paint used for the job.

First and foremost, as with any painting job, it is advised to have the surface clean and dry. Cleaning the aluminum siding would mean making use of a detergent solution or a high quality soap, whichever you have, as long as you get the residue out during rinsing. The use of a heavy sponge and scrub brush will also be necessary along with a hose or a pressure washer. Be careful with the use of the pressure washer though, and set it only at the appropriate setting to give you just enough force fit for your washing needs.

After washing, and after making sure that the aluminum siding of the house is thoroughly dry, then you can now apply the thinned metal primer, making sure it is tinted to half the strength of the original color of your finish. Though priming is not usually required for painting the aluminum siding with a high quality 100% acrylic latex paint, a good rule of thumb is to prime when in doubt. It is also a good idea to mix in a bonding agent for the priming process.

Application of the final coating should be done within 48 hours after the application of the primer, and the paint should be a top quality 100% acrylic latex paint. Using such in painting the aluminum siding will give the best performance needed for aluminum siding. This paint is durable and offers a fade-resistant finish that can last for years.

The paint may be applied by brush, but a better alternative would be the use of a spray. Painting the aluminum siding requires one to know what he is doing, thus you have to learn more about this by reading reference materials, or better yet – let a professional do it for you.

Hello from Toronto – A Culinary Tour of the St. Lawrence Market & An Exploration of HistoricSt. Lawrence Hall

Hello from Toronto – A Culinary Tour of the St. Lawrence Market & An Exploration of HistoricSt. Lawrence Hall

Life works in really strange and wonderful ways. At the beginning of this week I talked to my brother in Austria on the phone, and he said he’d been reading this German travel magazine and there was a big write-up about a Toronto-based tour guide who provides culinary tours of the St. Lawrence Market, one of my brother’s favourite places that he discovered on his recent trip to Toronto.
I asked my brother what this fellow’s name was and he looked it up and said “Bruce Bell”. I did an internet search and within a few seconds I had located Bruce Bell Tours ; and I knew I had to meet this person. Bruce Bell, the popular history columnist for the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Community Bulletin, is also an award winning playwright, actor, standup comedian and the honourary curator of the most photographed building in the city of Toronto, the historic Gooderham Building better known as the Flatiron. Bruce just recently published a book on Toronto called “Toronto – A Pictorial Celebration”.
Immediately after I hung up with my brother I was on the phone with Bruce, we briefly introduced ourselves and he said, come down, join me on Thursday for my culinary tour of the St. Lawrence Market. Sure enough, this morning, punctually at 10 am I arrived at the souvenir shop at the main entrance of the market and I met Bruce and the other participant in our tour, a young architecture student.
As the official historian of the St. Lawrence Market Bruce has special access to all sorts of areas of the building that other people never get to see. Right away he took us up some stairs, pulled out a special key and led us into the former mayor’s office, since the market building used to be the original city hall of Toronto. The building has undergone several transitions, and the two side wings were removed to make way for a steel-girdered shed built in 1904 that was modeled after the Victoria Train Station in London.
>From the former mayor’s office we had a perfect view of the market and we also had a beautiful vista of the downtown skyscrapers and the famous Flatiron Building to the west, and St. Lawrence Hall to the north. Bruce took us down the stairs in the market hall itself and shared various tidbits of history with us. The shoreline of Lake Ontario used to be right at Front Street, and after landfill was added, the Esplanade became the waterfront, and today several hundred meters of additional landfill have expanded the city’s territory to a new waterfront.
Under Bruce’s guidance we started our tour of the shops which include bakeries, butcher shops, fish mongers, fruit stands, delis, dessert places and specialty vendors of all kinds. The first place he took us to was a bakery that also serves lunches, and we got a delicious taste treat of smoked salmon and backbacon, each on a small piece of bread. I am not usually a big fish eater, but this savoury morcel was delicious. At another store we got to sample “Indian candy” – smoked salmon cured in maple syrop. What a treat!
We walked by some of the butcher shops, many of which have been in the same family for generations. I admired the creatively presented cuts of pork loin stuffed with spinach, cheese and bacon, a perfect solution for a non-chef like me – just stick it in the oven and pull out a delicious gourmet meal.
After a brief tour outside the building where Bruce explained the building’s history and early Toronto society to us, we went into the lower level, where all the dessert shops, fruit stalls and specialty vendors are located. We got several more samples: a huge variety of delicious honeys from New Zealand, a sampling of speciality jellies and jams, tender white chocolate truffles that just melt in your mouth, and for dessert – after all these sweat treats – Nutella-filled crepes. All the samples we received were utterly delicious.
Bruce took us into the bowels of the building, today mostly used for storage and refrigeration, but in previous times these areas were the men’s and women’s jails. Bruce explained that in the 1850s women had no rights and many men simply stuck their wives in prison, especially after child-birth or during menopause, when they got a little cranky. The iron hooks that prisoners were chained to are still visible on the walls.
The basement is also decorated with a number of murals that explain Toronto’s history. As the official historian of the St. Lawrence Market and a well-known columnist of the St. Lawrence Community Bulletin, Bruce is actually depicted on the mural. About 15 historic plaques throughout a variety of buildings in the downtown area provide insight into noteworthy past events and are titled “A Bruce Bell History Project”. So there is no doubt that this is a real expert, even a local celebrity.
Just outside the St. Lawrence Market used to be the terminus of the Underground Railroad, the pier where thousands of the former American slaves arrived after having made their secret passage from the American south to Rochester and on to freedom in Toronto. It’s amazing how much history there is, even in a comparably young city such as Toronto, and I thoroughly enjoyed listening to Bruce’s unique stories.
From the St. Lawrence Market building we walked north through a courtyard to another former City Hall of Toronto by the name of St. Lawrence Hall. It was the former city hall of the City of York, that was officially renamed the city of Toronto (an Indian word for “meeting place”) in 1856. St. Lawrence Hall is a beautiful classical building, and Bruce took us inside to show us the ballroom, the most well-preserved original ballroom in Canada. The chandelier is original, was originally lit with coal gas and today is illuminated with natural gas.
This was the heart of Toronto’s elite WASP (white / Anglo-Saxon / Protestant) society during the 1800s and Bruce shed more light on the many behavioural norms of the time. Women were not considered persons and could not walk on the street by themselves or accompanied by any man other than their husband. Men had to defend their wives’ honour in duels and sometimes ended up having to shoot their best friend as a result of a harmless (by today’s standards) misunderstanding. The city and country were run by English noblemen, and Catholic immigrants from Ireland, arriving in masses after the potato famine of 1849, were despised by the local ruling class.
As a result, the Catholics were segregated, but they did receive a spot inside St. Lawrence Hall, a big room called St. Patrick’s Hall, where they were allowed to congregate since they were barred from entering the ballroom which was reserved for the WASP elite. Irish Catholics had to enter St. Patrick’s Hall through a back staircase since they weren’t allowed to mix with the English aristocracy. The portion on the northeast side of St. Lawrence Hall housing St. Patrick’s Hall incidentally collapsed in 1967 and was completely rebuilt.
After St. Lawrence Hall we walked through a beautiful Victorian Garden outside of St. James Cathedral, Toronto’s largest house of worship, and the 5th church in the present location. Bruce took us inside and shared more historical information with us, about the original British settlers of Toronto and ruling elite of the times, which included the famous Bishop Strachan, the creator of St. James Cathedral. Bruce showed us the various stained glass windows that adorn the church, all of which were crafted at different times. Especially stunning are the Tiffany stained glass windows on the east side which have a particularly intense coloration.
St. James Cathedral marked the end of our culinary and historic tour of the St. Lawrence Market area. We had received a great introduction to Toronto’s history and enjoyed the diverse culinary delicacies of Toronto’s greatest market. Bruce’s entertaining and informative lessons on a time in Toronto’s history when women and men were segregated, when society was strictly regimented by expectations of etiquette and social status, and when Irish and English weren’t allowed to mix made me realize how incredibly far Toronto has come in the last 150 years.
Bruce Bell offers other interesting tours about Toronto’s Distillery District, its Art Deco skyscrapers and a tour called “Comfort and Steam” that takes you through the Fairmount Royal York Hotel, Union Station, the Skydome and the Air Canada Centre, among other places. Considering everything that I learned in the St. Lawrence Market tour, I hope to have a chance to catch another one of Bruce’s tours and broaden my local knowledge of this city in the near future.

Main : Hard Drive Recovery

Main : Hard Drive Recovery

KWD : 16/514 = 3.11%

Hard Drive Recovery

Hard drive recovery is an important tool to combat data loss. Many threats to computers could lessen data accessibility. It could be as simple as file deletion. Or, as catastrophic as hard disk failure. Whatever it may be, the necessary for hard drive recovery in both circumstances is foremost.

The number one rule in hard drive recovery is if you accidentally delete files; do not to write anything more to the hard drive. This hard drive recovery rule applies in every circumstance. If you delete a partition, do not create another. Leave it blank instead. If you happen to delete files in the recycle bin which you consider important, do not save anything to the drive. This hard drive recovery suggestion may sound puzzling but the reason for this is that hard drives do not delete anything, whether data or partition. When you delete a file, the data is still in the drive. What happened is that the operating system marks the physical area of the disc as available for future use while leaving the original data there. The computer hides the file so you can no longer get to it. It’s still there until a new data is written over it. So if you save another data to the drive, it will consider files marked ‘deleted’ as empty space and copy over them. If that happens, then the deleted data is in trouble in turn affecting hard drive recovery procedures.

The same rule applies to partition. If there is no partition information, the operating system cannot read any data. But that does not mean that the data is not there. Only, you can’t read it. If you have just one partition and the operating system does not function, the best option is to transfer the drive to another computer.

Transferring the drive to another computer prevents the drive from being accidentally written over and potentially allows you to access the data in turn implement hard drive recovery by using Windows Explorer. If you erased essential operating system files, the drive can still be read from another operating system. If you cannot transfer the hard disk, resist the temptation of re-installing the operating system.

The simplest method to hard drive recovery with single partition with damaged operating system is to boot your computer with DOS boot disk. Then use a DOS compatible file recovery program.

Installing your had drive into another computer or putting a new drive with separate operating system into your current machine will enable you to attempt access to you data through Windows File Explorer. And you can safely try hard drive recovery since you have a completely separate hard drive. Freeware hard drive recovery programs are also available to facilitate the task of hard drive recovery. One can choose from various options.

The hard drive recovery tools suggested above are meant to facilitate hard drive recovery efforts. If all else fails, a hard drive recovery service could be the last option. Hard drive recovery service could be much more expensive but data saved could be worth it.

When Human Beings Take It To The Limit

When Human Beings Take It To The Limit

In life we all have dreams and goals, aspirations to follow a certain path that will lead to social achievements and personal growth. We all hope to fulfill a destiny where we can put all of our efforts into one activity or more that helps the world in one way or another. Recently I went to see a musical group called Taikoz and I believe I was witness to a certain level of human achievement that was simply mind-blowing. These people have obviously trained and practiced so much that they have reached a level of mastery. They have taken the human life experience to the limit.
Taikoz are a multicultural group based in Australia who focuses on the ancient art of Japanese Taiko drumming. One of the group’s members, Riley Lee, also plays a traditional Japanese bamboo flute called a shakuhachi. He is world renown for being the first non-Japanese person to be given the title Grand Master of this sacred Zen Buddhist instrument.
Let me give you an idea about this concert. It was held in a relatively small opera-style, three-tiered theatre and I was fortunate enough to get front-row middle seats. Throughout the evening the handful of drummers played approximately 50 different drums, and play they did! For over two hours they beat out multiple complex rhythms, sometimes whilst dancing, and occasionally intermingled with the most beautifully peaceful flute accompaniment you have ever imagined.
Now, what truly got to me was these people’s physical, mental, and spiritual presence. The drums, some two and a half meters high, hit every single person in the crowd right in the stomach. However, it was the intensity in the drummers’ eyes and muscle-strained bodies that infected the crowd with an electric energy that left everyone feeling like they had run a marathon by the end of the night. Of course all we were really doing was sitting down.
As the group assembled for a song at the front of the stage, kneeling down to play Japanese snare drums that would later take my spirit out of the body and throw it into thundering rain clouds, I saw the many faces of human perfection. Eyes like tigers’, bodies straining like bunches of twitching ropes, sweat dripping in puddles around them; I saw and felt the feeling that one feels when you have taken a certain activity to the limit. Totally entranced, as serious as one could ever be in concentration, yet smiling now and then as the realization of what they were doing, the fun they were having, and the endorphins flowing like the wind through their systems all culminated into one beautiful feeling. I tasted it in the air. I drank it in. I connected to their energies with my own, giving them all my love and appreciation. Most of all, I was inspired.
Seeing people take it ‘to the limit’ can have a profound affect on a person— as you can probably see from the way I am writing this article when recollecting that specific moment in time. Oh, the music was powerful and enchanting and ethereal, but it was the feeling of human effort and achievement that pervaded the air and minds of all those in the crowd that night. I’d have to say, without a hint of doubt, that concert was one of the best, most enlightening experiences of my thirty year lifespan. It gave me the secret, special knowledge that one day it is still possible to make my own dreams come true.
How many of us know that we can become the people we hope to become? How many of us believe that we can work at something and in the end achieve a level of greatness? Our society is currently filled with doubt, fear, skepticism and cynicism. Please don’t despair. We are fortunate that through the observance of others in our human clan, we can still see the potential that each of us has within. Why don’t you become the inspiring source for someone else who is underestimating his or her capabilities? Why don’t you be the next one to take it to the limit?
Check out Taikoz’s website at www.Taikoz.com

  • February 25, 2018
  • News

Everything You wanted To Know About Solar Panels

Everything You wanted To Know About Solar Panels

The history of solar panels can be dated back to 1839 as this was the period when French physicist Antoine-Cesar Becquerel made the astonishing discovery of the photovoltaic effect. This surprising discovery took place during an experiment that involved an electrolytic cell made from two metal electrodes and was placed within an electrolyte solution. Antoine-Cesar Becquerel discovered during the experiment that when the electrolytic cells were exposed to light, it produced a certain amount of electricity. The more the light, the more the production of electricity and that is how solar panels actually came into the picture.

Almost 50 years later in 1883, the first solar cell was developed by Charles Fritts and it was formed using selenium coating sheets with a micro-thin layer of gold. Between the period of 1883 and 1941 there were several scientists as well as inventors who with the help of companies started experimenting with solar energy. It was during this period that Clarence Kemp, an inventor from Baltimore patented the first ever commercial water heater that was being powered by solar energy. Apart from this, the great scientist Albert Einstein also published a thesis on photoelectric effect and within a short period of time received the coveted Nobel Prize for his thesis and valuable research.

Around 1941, an American inventor named Russell Ohl who was working for Bell Laboratories patented the first ever silicon solar cell. This new invention was spearheaded by the Bell Laboratories and they went on to produce the first ever crystalline silicon solar panel in the year 1954. This was the most effective solar cells in that era as it achieved a 4 percent return on overall energy conversion. In the next few years several scientists from all over the world continued their research, study and experimentation to improve upon the original solar cells and started producing solar cells that gave 6% efficiency on overall energy conversion.

The first ever large scale deployment and use of solar energy ever recorded was in space satellites. USA was the first country to enable production of solar cells that gave 20% efficiency and this was in the year 1980. By 2000, USA had produced several solar cells that were producing 24% efficiency. Last year, two large companies, Emcore Photovoltaics and Spectrolab rose to dominate the world of solar cell production by producing cells that gave 28% efficiency.

Working of Solar Panels

The solar panel basically consists of pure silicon. Silicon is first stripped of all its impurities and hence provides the most ideal neutral platform for enhancing the transmission of electrons. In its natural state, Silicon can carry at the max four electrons although it has the ability to carry eight. So mathematically speaking it has enough room for 4 more electrons.

When a silicon atom is made to come into contact with a second silicon atom then each of them receive each other’s extra four electrons. So the 8 electrons satisfy a single silicon atoms’ needs and this results in the creations of a strong bond but the fact is that there are no negative or positive charges. To produce a large piece of pure silicon, the silicon atoms have to go through the process of combination for years. Once the pure silicon is ready, it is applied on to the plates of solar panels. When silicon is combined with other elements then it produces a positive or negative charge.

Solar panels are being looked as the provider of tomorrow as the other forms of creating electricity are getting replenished by the day. There are several online sources and websites who are selling solar panels with a power range that varies from 10WP to 280WP.

History of the Stove-top Espresso Maker

History of the Stove-top Espresso Maker

The story of the stove-top espresso maker begins in 1918, when Alfonso Bialetti returned to his native Italy from France, where he had worked in the aluminium industry, to start a small workshop manufacturing metal household goods.
The actual idea for the stove-top espresso maker came from a simple washing machine. During the 1920s Alfonso Bialetti observed the local women of Crusinallo washing their clothes in a sealed boiler with a small central pipe. This pipe would draw up the soapy water from the bottom of the boiler and redistribute it over the laundry. Alfonso Bialetti hit upon the idea that he could adapt this washing machine and scale it down to make a simple coffee maker that would allow Italians to enjoy real ‘espresso type’ coffee in their private homes.
Alfonso Bialetti began tinkering away, building various prototypes. His prototype stove-top espresso makers were manufactured out of aluminium. This was due to there being an embargo imposed by Mussolini’s government on stainless steel. As Italy had a rich source of bauxite (aluminium ore), aluminium became the ‘National Metal’ of Italy.
It was not until 1933, after solving many technical problems, that Alfonso Bialetti invented the world’s first stove-top espresso maker, the Moka Express. The distinctive design and octagonal shape of the Moka Express was based on a silver coffee service, popular at the time in wealthy Italian homes. Alfonso Bialetti claimed of his Moka Express that “without requiring any ability whatsoever” one could enjoy “in casa un espresso come al bar” – ‘an espresso in the home just like in a bar’ (coffeehouse).
Alfonso Bialetti began selling his Moka Express at local, and later regional markets, managing to make and sell around 10,000 units per year. It was not until after WWII, when Alfonso’s son Renato Bialetti joined the family business that sales of the Moka Express really took off. Renato Bialetti realised the potential of the Moka Express and launched a major national advertising campaign. This risk was greatly rewarded, with increased sales; production levels had to be raised to a rate of around 1,000 units per day. The Bialetti Moka Express soon became the market leader in Italy, surpassing sales of the traditional ‘Neapolitan’ percolator style coffeemaker, in which brewing occurs without pressure. Not only did the Moka Express produce ‘espresso type’ coffee, which Italians adored, it also brewed coffee much quicker then its rivals.
Many companies saw the success the Moka Express was enjoying and copied the design to manufacture their own version of the stove-top espresso maker. This is why, in 1953, Renato Bialetti came up with the idea of adding a company mascot to every Moka Express to help promote the brand identity that is Bialetti. He used a caricature of his father Alfonso Bialetti to invent the “Omino Con I Baffi” – ‘Little Man with a Moustache’. This mascot proved popular as it created an image of an Italian father or fond elder relative who had lived his life in the coffeehouse.
The design of the Moka Express has hardly changed in over 70 years of manufacturing. Aluminium is still used to this day, as it is claimed that the residue of coffee from the previous brews that taints the sides of a Moka pot adds flavour and depth to future brews. This is why it is recommended that you do not clean your Moka Express too thoroughly.
Bialetti, now the world leader in the manufacture of domestic coffee makers, still strives to offer “in casa un espresso come al bar”. With the improvement in espresso machines in coffeehouses, Bialetti has sought to develop new technologies, creating new stove-top espresso maker models. They now produce: stainless steel models, such as the Venus; an electric model, the Moka Easy; a new pressure system, the Brikka – which produces a ‘crema’ top on your coffee; and now a stove-top cappuccino maker, the Mukka Express.

Bathroom Glass: Invisible Opportunities.

Bathroom Glass: Invisible Opportunities.

Glass is very ancient material. Now it’s very difficult to invent something new in glass making. Though we can still enhance the strength of the glass and vary the bathroom design.

The main methods of enhancing the strength of glass and its safety are based on the latest production technologies. Today glass is used to produce virtually all products, that’s why glass objects are widely applied in the interiors of living and non-living premises. But mainly it is found in the bathroom interiors: it makes these rooms spacious and airy.

Quite often in the new bathroom design ideas there are lots of design projects where we come across the combination of a bathroom and a bedroom, where the doors are replaced with the glass walls, movable panels or shields made of transparent or matte glass. This bathroom and bedroom combination creates an illusion of one common room which is very important if the bathroom space is not big enough.

Tinted, transparent or matte glass walls, open glass shelves can become an “invisible” zoning element in a large bathroom, where the bath area is rather remote from the wash stand. Even the low decorative walls will make the bathroom interior look heavy, but the glass walls will make it more functional and cozy.

Among a variety of glass types presented in the bathroom design projects (transparent, matte, tinted), a new product – variable-transparency glass appeared recently in the bathroom stores. It does not break, it is absolutely safe and adds an air of some mystery in the bathroom aura: when the lights are on – it is transparent, but it becomes matte when the lights go down. Such glass is widely used in design of the interiors including bathrooms.

New bathroom installation or old bathroom remodeling would give you an opportunity to make the interiors of your bathroom bright and airy. You may use colour (bent, fused, roasted, sintered) glass, it will shine with all the colours of the rainbow under the bathroom halogen waterproof spotlights. This glass is used to produce not only washbasins, bathtubs and bathroom worktops of the bizarre form, but also bathroom glass furniture: it does not overload the area and it does not make even the smallest bathroom look narrow.

Shower cubicles with the glass doors can be both a bathroom accessory and attire of the interiors. Various types of fit-outs and colour glass create additional opportunities to set your interiors apart.

Glass floor in the new bathroom design (a special kind of glass with anti-slip surface is used for it) is a very original idea, it is also comfortable and functional – when the upper lights are off such floor becomes a magic source of light. Besides, there is such a great variety of glass floors. The bathroom floor can be made of color glass with or without highlighting, it can have illuminated elements in the form of still-life of shells, sand and pebble.

When the bathroom has several zones, you can arrange them at different levels. Glass edges of the stairs with illumination can be a perfect decorative component in such large bathroom. Their light combined with the water flows reflecting in the mirrors will create inimitable sense of the magic palace.

Stained glass is a fashionable element of the bathroom interiors now. It can decorate the wall adjoining the hall. Then on turning the lights in the bathroom, you can enjoy the view of the stained glass from the hall and on the contrary: the light in the hall will be enough to take the bathroom in the romantic atmosphere. The translucent ceiling in the bathroom as well as decorative illuminated alcoves will turn the usual ritual of taking bath or shower into a more pleasant procedure, in the aesthetic sense.

The more glass you have in your bathroom, the more attractive it is, with the illusion of mystery and you will unravel it every time you expose your body to the warm sprays of the shower or taking aroma bath.

The exclusive bathroom glass interior is able to work wonders: leaving your bathroom, every time you will feel full of energy you cannot do without.

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